Is anyone else also celiac?


#1

I have celiac disease and microscopic lymphocytic colitis plus the OLP. My GI doctor pointed out they all affect the GI tract from one end to the other. He prescribed Asacol for my other problems and it seems to have greatly helped my OLP. Has anyone else had experience with Asacol? Any other celiacs??


#2

No, I’m not. My mother cannot digest gluten, but that is the result of an accident that resulted in a significant portion being removed surgically, so while I do not have a genetic predisposition to becoming celiac I do know quite a bit about it as I have tried to educate myself about gluten intolerance.

I just looked up Asacol and see that it is an anti-inflammatory drug. LP certainly is inflammatory! I had to see a GI doctor because of some digestive issues I did not think were in any way related to LP, and eventually he gave me a list of foods to eliminate from my diet for three months (only the items I consumed regularly) and gradually reintroduce them one at a time to see if perhaps there was a dietary cause. What we discovered is that I can’t tolerate tomato (the one food that made me vomit through both my pregnancies), and it was one thing I used to eat a lot of. It’ sa bit of a hassle to eliminate tomato, as it shows up in so many foods, but knowing what my mother must do (she can’t digest gluten, lactose or fat…) puts it in perspective: I’m cutting out condiments, not somthing that for many is the dietary staff of life (my mother obviously has been fabulous about accomodating my tomato-free diet, but she and I live a thousand miles apart so what she can do to
help me is limited to recipe tips, etc. My husband and children have bene fabulous, and I have promised them that this year when the fresh vine-ripened local tomatoes are ready I will go back to making the fresh sauces they love and miss so much. My mother-in-law, who lives very close to me, however, just doesn’t get it. She’ll say, “But this just has a little bit, you can’t even see it…” and take offence when I say “No, thanks, but I cannot eat that,” or, “I love this dish the way you make it, but unless you’ve left out the tomato I really can’t have any, even though I’d like to,” or, “Gosh is there tomato in that salad? I’d better not have any,” or… And it kind of drives me nuts because she has diabetes and really should understand that sometimes a person simply cannot eat everything that someone else puts on their plate (but, in fact, that’s how she treats the dietary recommendations she has been given regarding the control of her blood sugar, and perhaps that is
why she is now dependant on insulin whereas someone like my father, who acts as a voluneer counseler for his local chapter of a diabetes society, still manages to controol his primarily through diet…).

Anyway, doctors seem to be investigating diet as a factor in some inflammatory conditions but I don’t know how much they understand.

I would imagine that you are not looking for cookbooks etc. with advice for celiacs (as soon as my mother figured out that she had to eat GF she bought all of Betty Hagman’s wonderful cookbooks, read them and got me to me to read them), but I have found some wonderful resources. Last year for her birthday I gave my mother a desert cookbook written by a French-trained American professional pastry chef whose sister was diagnosed as celiac. She says every recipe she has tried from it has been fabulous. I keep a stash of GF staples on hand for when my mom visits, and in fact have adopted some as staples that I use in my everyday cooking (I think I want to encourage my local grocery stores to keep a good selection of GF foods in stock – but some of them can be freakishly expensive! In some countries you can actually get a tax deduction for GF diets, but it seems to involve an enormous amount of paperwork).

----- Original Message ----
From: Lia lplanus-cpt4251@lists.careplace.com
To: deirdrechic@yahoo.com
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 12:00:59 AM
Subject: [lplanus] Is anyone else also celiac?


#3

Thanks for the reply! Would be interested in the name of the dessert
cookbook - don’t think I have ever seen it anywhere. I got one from Roben
Ryberg that uses corn and potato starch in lieu of rice flour and the
texture is not so dry. Makes great onion rings. Do you also have OLP? I
also have candida in my mouth and the clotrimazole troches prescribed for
that also help heal my OLP lesions. I actually deduct the difference in
cost for GF food - a flat percentage - on my taxes and will argue if they
audit me. Tomatoes would be a real problem for me and I can empathize with
you. Over time celiacs become lactose intolerant so I share that with your
mother and I am diabetic like your father. I appreciate the new Redbridge
GF beer and that Walmart carries Van’s GF waffles for $1.67 instead of
$3.29. More grocery stores are putting in a natural food section but no
cheaper that health food stores.
Lia

liamoysey@earthlink.net
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----- Original Message -----
From: “DDD” lplanus-cpt4251@lists.careplace.com
To: liamoysey@earthlink.net
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 9:31 AM
Subject: Re: [lplanus] Is anyone else also celiac?


#4

Just LP of skin.

What I forgot to mention as I blathered on was that th eLP on my skinalso improved (along with eth GI issue) when I cut out tomatoes. Something in them causes me to have an inflammatory reaction. I’ve experimented with other “nightshades” (potato, aubergine/eggplant) and they don’t seem to be a problem.

I’ve already called my mother to let her know that she should look out for GF foods at her loal Wal-Mart. She lives in a small town so sourcing special food can be challenging, but they do have a Wal-Mart.

D

----- Original Message ----
From: Lia lplanus-cpt4251@lists.careplace.com
To: deirdrechic@yahoo.com
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2007 2:01:24 PM
Subject: Re: [lplanus] Is anyone else also celiac?